• Longjing/ Dragonwell

    Longjing/ Dragonwell

    Longjing tea (simplified Chinese: 龙井茶; traditional Chinese: 龍井茶; pinyin: lóngjǐng chá), sometimes called by its literal translated name Dragon Well tea, is a variety of pan-roasted green tea from the area of Longjing Village near Hangzhou in Zhejiang Province, China. It is produced mostly by hand and renowned for its high quality, earning it the China Famous Tea title.

  • Baihao Yinzhen/ White Hair Silver Needle

    Baihao Yinzhen/ White Hair Silver Needle

    Baihao Yinzhen (simplified Chinese: 白 毫 银 针; traditional Chinese: 白 毫 銀 針), also known as White Hair Silver Needle, is a white tea produced in Fujian Province in China.[1] Amongst white teas, this is the most expensive variety and the most prized, as only top buds (leaf shoots) are used to produce the tea.[2] Genuine Silver Needles are made from cultivars of the Da Bai (Large White) tea tree family. There are other productions that look similar with downy leaf shoots but most are green teas, and as green teas, they taste differently and have a different biochemical potency than the genuine white tea Silver Needle.[3] It is commonly included among China's famous teas.

  • Shoumei/ Longevity Eyebrows

    Shoumei/ Longevity Eyebrows

    Shoumei (simplified Chinese: 寿眉; traditional Chinese: 壽眉; pinyin: shòuméi; Cantonese Yale: sauh méi) is a white tea that is produced from naturally withered upper leaf and tips, with a stronger flavor reminiscent of lighter Oolong teas. It is mostly grown in the Fujian Province or Guangxi Province in China.[1] Because it is plucked later than Bai Mudan, the tea may be darker in color, but it should still have a proportionate green color. Some lower grades of Shou Mei may be golden in color with a lot of black and red leaves, making a darker brew with more depth.[1]

    Technically this tea, being a fourth grade tea, is a by-product of Bai Hao Yinzhen tea production and uses Da Bai or Large White leaves.

  • Puerh


    Pu-erh or Pu'er is a variety of aged dark tea produced in Yunnan province, China.[1] Fermentation is a tea production style in which the tea leaves undergo microbial fermentation and oxidation after they are dried and rolled.[2] This process is a Chinese specialty and produces tea known as Hei Cha (黑茶), commonly translated as dark, or black tea (this type of tea is different from what in the West is known as "black tea", which in China is called "red tea" 红茶). The best known variety of this category of tea is Pu-erh from Yunnan Province, named after the trading post for dark tea during imperial China.

    Pu'er traditionally begins as a raw product known as "rough" Mao Cha (毛茶) and can be sold in this form or pressed into a number of shapes and sold as "raw" Sheng Cha (生茶). Both of these forms then undergo the complex process of gradual fermentation and maturation with time. The Wo Dui fermentation process (渥堆) developed in 1973 by the Kunming Tea Factory [3]:206 [4] created a new type of pu-erh tea. This process involves an accelerated fermentation into "ripe" Shu Cha (熟茶) which is then stored loose or pressed into various shapes. The fermentation process was adopted at the Menghai Tea Factory shortly after and technically developed there.[5] The legitimacy of shu cha is disputed by some traditionalists in contrast to aged teas. All types of pu-erh can be stored to mature before consumption, which is why it is commonly labelled with year and region of production.

  • Tikuanyin


    Tieguanyin (simplified Chinese: 铁观音; traditional Chinese: 鐵觀音; pinyin: tiěguānyīn; Jyutping: tit3 gun1 jam1; Pe̍h-ōe-jī: Thih-koan-im; literally: "Iron Goddess of Mercy") is a premium variety of Chinese oolong tea originated in the 19th century in Anxi in Fujian province. Tieguanyin produced in different areas of Anxi have different gastronomic characteristics.

Tea In Cup